Hot Tamales

Dad and I finally decided to try our hand at making hot tamales this weekend. The fact that it coincided with Street Food week on Reddit’s 52 weeks of cooking didn’t hurt the decision either. 

13We actually made two different fillings for the tamales, one with some leftover meat from a recipe we made last weekend, and one with a new batch of meat that we started on Sunday morning.

1Step One – cut a pork cute into small chunks and boil for 2.5 hours.

2Meanwhile, I started prepping everything else. Can you believe that in Mississippi, I had to go to two grocery stores to find lard? Unbelievable! Also, the corn husks came from Amazon.

In the second picture, the corns husks are soaking in the orange bowl under the bucket of lard while I start making the tamale dough.

3On the left: thawed and reheated Carne Adobada from last weekend.

On the right: once the pork butt was cooked through, we shredded it and returned it to the pot (sans cooking liquid) with vegetable oil and lots of spices to give it some flavor. The recipe for the pork is here.

4It was time to get our Henry Ford on! Mom scooped the dough into each corn husk and flattened it out. Then, I added the meat and rolled the tamale.

5After they were rolled and folded (that’s dad folding), they were tied into bundles of three.

6We ended up with a total of 93 tamales. Our limiting factor was corn husks (we had purchased a 1-lb. bag of them). We could have made more dough and had more than enough meat to continue.

The tamales went into pots where they steamed for an hour and a half. I grilled up some corn for the side and dinner was served!

13

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Ruth’s Fresh Coconut Cake

Coconut CakeMy family knows a lovely lady named Ruth. For many years, she has made us a delicious coconut cake at Christmas time. I’ve always thought coconut was gross and didn’t want to even try this cake. I decided I could at least try it this year at Christmas and OH MY GOSH – I can’t believe I had been voluntarily missing this for so long.

For my dad’s birthday, I asked Ruth if we could make this cake together for him so that I could learn the recipe. And when she gave me the shopping list, I was shocked to find that it used a boxed cake mix. BUT, this is still a delicious and easy coconut cake. Besides, the magic of this cake is in the frosting!

Ruth's Fresh Coconut Cake
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Ingredients
  1. Coconut Supreme cake mix
  2. 3 eggs
  3. vegetable oil
  4. 1 whole coconut
  5. 1 container cool whip
  6. 1 container sour cream
  7. 2.5 cups sugar, divided
  8. 1 tsp coconut flavoring
Instructions
  1. Mix Coconut Supreme cake mix and bake according to directions on the box (using eggs and vegetable oil), in two round cake pans. Allow to cool and remove from pans.
  2. Split each cake in half once completely cooled.
  3. Open the coconut, reserving the coconut juice, and grate the coconut.
  4. Put coconut juice into a small saucepan with 1 cup sugar and 1 tsp coconut flavoring. Bring to boil and let cook until it is stringy. Remove from heat and let cool.
  5. In a large bowl, mix together 2/3 container of sour cream and 1.5 cups sugar. Stir until sugar is dissolved. Add 3/4 container of cool whip and 1/4 cup grated coconut. Mix until well incorporated. If needed, add more cool whip for a firmer frosting.
  6. Place the first layer of cake on a cake plate and spoon 1/3 of the coconut juice mixture over the cake, letting it soak into the layer. Then, top with 1/6 of the frosting. Sprinkle grated coconut on top of the frosting if you wish. Repeat for the first three layers. (The top layer shouldn't have any coconut juice in it.)
  7. Place the top layer and add the remainder of the frosting. Spread it out evenly along the top and sides of the cake. Then, cover the top and sides of the cake with grated coconut.
Notes
  1. This cake freezes extremely well and may even be BETTER after being frozen and thawed.
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Challenge Week 5: Vanilla – Vanilla Bean Waffles with Vanilla Maple Syrup

I’m working my way through Reddit’s 52 Weeks of Cooking Challenge. The challenge is aimed to help any level cook expand their knowledge and cook outside of their comfort zones.

Week five theme – Vanilla.

waffles

 I had a difficult time deciding what to do for vanilla week. Not because I don’t love vanilla, but because I wanted to do something different. I was having trouble thinking of a savory way to use vanilla, but I knew I didn’t want to do a dessert, so I compromised on breakfast. Where you can eat dessert without it actually BEING dessert.

These waffles have the vanilla bean caviar (the scrapings from inside the bean) in the waffle batter along with some vanilla extract. Then, I simmered the maple syrup with the empty vanilla bean pod to infuse it with vanilla as well. While the vanilla flavor wasn’t overwhelming, it was definitely there and definitely good!

Vanilla Bean Waffles with Vanilla Maple Syrup
Yields 6
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Ingredients
  1. 1 1/2 cups AP flour
  2. 1/4 cup packed brown sugar
  3. 2 tsp baking powder
  4. 1 1/2 cups milk
  5. 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  6. 2 large eggs
  7. 1 vanilla bean
  8. 1 tsp vanilla extract
  9. maple syrup
Instructions
  1. In a large bowl (or mixer), stir together the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Add the milk, oil and eggs. Split the vanilla bean in half and scrape the seeds out with the back of a knife. Add seeds to the batter and mix until well blended.
  2. Pour maple syrup (however much you intend to use on your waffles) into a pan and add the scraped out vanilla bean pods. Heat and allow vanilla flavor to infuse into the syrup.
  3. Preheat your waffle iron and spray it with nonstick spray. Cook the batter according to the manufacturer's directions until golden brown.
  4. Serve warm with syrup.
I'm in the Kitchen http://connorguyton.me/
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Vegan Enchilada Stuffed Bell Pepper Boats

I have a brother – his name is John. If you’ve been around my blog very long, you already know that much. He decided several months ago to be Vegan 4-5 days a week. Then on the weekends, he can gorge himself on the meat that we love so much.

When I was making my Stuffed Bell Peppers the other night, I had this idea that I really wanted Enchilada Stuffed Bell Peppers. But for whatever reason, I went with an Italian theme instead. I did, however, come up an idea for a  veggie filled enchilada version to send to my brother. He made it for dinner last night and sent me the picture and recipe. I will leave some of his humor in the recipe since he wrote it.

IMG_6983I know that probably looks gross but he said it was really tasty. I’m just glad I got him to turn the plate around and rearrange the carrots so I didn’t have a smiley face!

A few notes that he sent along:

  • “I like bell pepper boats so that’s what I made.”
  • If you want it to be truly vegan, read the labels on the cans of enchilada sauce (or make your own) because some of them have chicken flavoring in them. 
  • It could have used a bit more texture – possibly using some wild rice or quinoa to add some bite back to the mush.
  • If you eat cheese, add some on top of the peppers before baking.

Vegan Enchilada Stuffed Bell Peppers
Serves 4
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Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
45 min
Prep Time
10 min
Cook Time
45 min
Ingredients
  1. 4 green bell peppers
  2. 2 large portabella mushroom caps, chopped into 1/2-inch pieces
  3. 1 head of broccoli, chopped very small
  4. 1 4oz can of diced green chiles
  5. 1 small white onion, finely chopped
  6. 1 can of enchilada sauce
  7. 3/4 cup lentils*
  8. small can of corn kernels
  9. minced garlic
  10. cumin
  11. garlic powder
  12. chili powder
  13. salt
  14. pepper
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  2. Cook the lentils according to the package directions.
  3. Meanwhile, slice the bell peppers in half, removing as much seeds and membrane as possible. Parboil or microwave the peppers until they are crisp-tender.
  4. Saute the onion and garlic over medium-high heat until they reach the aromatic euphoria that every good recipe begins with.
  5. Stir in the mushroom pieces, broccoli, green chilies, half of the enchilada sauce, and the corn. Reduce heat to medium-low. Add cumin, garlic powder, chili powder and pepper. (Alternatively, you could use taco seasoning mix.)
  6. Cook for 5 to 8 minutes until all of the flavors come together.
  7. Once the lentils are tender, drain them well and pour into a large bowl. Add the sautéed vegetable medley and stir to combine. Taste your filling and season accordingly.
  8. Spoon the mixture into the bell pepper boats and place them on a baking sheet.
  9. Bake for 20 minutes.
  10. Once they are done, allow them to cool. Meanwhile, post a picture on Instagram with your favorite filter so that all of your other foodie-friends can be envious of the savory feast that awaits you. Alternatively, FaceTime your sister asking her how to make the plate look pretty.
  11. Stash the rest in the fridge for lunches and dinners for the rest of the week.**
Notes
  1. *Lentils could be exchanged for other beans or a grain.
  2. **John cooked all of his at once to reheat throughout the week. My suggestion would to be to store the filling separately and bake inside of the bell peppers before eating.
About the spices
  1. Apologies for not having set amount of the different spices in this recipe. We grew up in a house where a pinch of this and a dash of that and plenty of taste-testing was the way to go.
I'm in the Kitchen http://connorguyton.me/
 

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Challenge Week 4: Ingredient you Hated as a Kid – Stuffed Peppers

I’m working my way through Reddit’s 52 Weeks of Cooking Challenge. The challenge is aimed to help any level cook expand their knowledge and cook outside of their comfort zones.

Week four theme – Ingredient you hated as a kid.

bell pepperI was apparently a very confused child. If there was bell pepper or onion in a dish, you had to be 100% sure I wouldn’t see it or I wouldn’t eat it. It didn’t matter how many times you told me that I wouldn’t be able to taste it, I would not eat it.  Sorry mom.

However, at some point (very likely on shish kabobs) I realized that bell pepper and onion are actually delicious and should go in everything. There are very few dinners that I create that I don’t start by putting garlic, onion and bell pepper in a pan.

When this challenge theme came around, I knew immediately that I needed to highlight something that I disliked SO much before. So these Semi-Italian Stuffed Bell Peppers were the answer.

Note: I also came up with a vegetarian friendly Enchilada Stuffed Bell Pepper (which would also be made Vegan) that my brother made. The recipe for it is here!

Semi-Italian Stuffed Bell Peppers
Yields 6
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Prep Time
40 min
Cook Time
25 min
Total Time
1 hr 5 min
Prep Time
40 min
Cook Time
25 min
Total Time
1 hr 5 min
Ingredients
  1. 4 oz wild rice, uncooked
  2. 6 bell peppers
  3. 1lb lean ground beef
  4. 1/2 onion
  5. 1 Tbsp minced garlic
  6. 1.5 cups marinara sauce
  7. 1 Tbsp dry basil
  8. 1/2 cup parmesan cheese
Instructions
  1. Cook wild rice according to package directions.
  2. Remove the caps from the bell peppers and remove membranes and seeds from the inside.
  3. Place peppers cut-side down in a casserole dish and cover with plastic wrap. Microwave on high for two minutes, until crisp tender.
  4. Brown ground beef in a large skillet. Add onion and garlic when meat is almost cooked through.
  5. Add cooked rice, marinara sauce, basil and 1/4 cup parmesan to the meat mixture.
  6. Stir until combined and spoon mixture into peppers.
  7. Add remaining parmesan on top.
  8. Cover with foil and bake at 450 degrees for 20 minutes. Remove foil and continue cooking for 5 additional minutes.
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The Pastrami Project

My dad and I have been working on this awesome project. When we were at Katz’s Deli in NYC, we had a delicious platter of corned beef, pastrami and brisket. Inspired, we took on the project of making our own corned beef and pastrami ourselves, from scratch. 

Day One - January 8, 2014

Day One – January 8, 2014

The final two ingredients for our pastrami project finally came in – two whole packer briskets and Instacure #1. Each brisket weighed about 13 pounds and the Instacure came from Amazon. Step one was to trim the two briskets – remove the point from the flap and trim off most of the fat. The pieces that would become corned beef needed all of the outer fat removed, while we left a little of the outer fat on the pastrami pieces.

Day One - January 8, 2014

Day One – January 8, 2014

Meanwhile, I made the cure. Water plus a whole bunch of salt and a whole bunch of spices. All of the spices shown here went into it plus mace, juniper berries and cardamon seeds. I boiled the spice mixture to get the salt to dissolve, then combined it with cold water to cool it off.

Day One - January 8, 2014

Day One – January 8, 2014

When the trimming was finished, we had four pieces of meat, about 3.5 pounds each. The pieces with the visible layer of fat will be the pastrami, the leaner ones will be the corned beef. We also ended up with 12 pounds of beef fat.

Day One - January 8, 2014

Day One – January 8, 2014

All four pieces of meat went into the big bucket-o-brine – don’t worry, it’s a food safe bucket of brine. We also used a turkey roasting bag to make it extra food safe. Look at that beautiful meat and all those lovely spices. 

We held the meat down using a plate and it took up my entire fridge for 10 days. During that time, we rearranged the meat about once a day. The goal was for all of the edges of the meat to have a chance to be exposed to the brine.

Day Eleven - January 18, 2014

Day Eleven – January 18, 2014

Once the curing process was over, the meat was ready for the next part of the adventure. The pastrami pieces went into a big pot of cold water for 12 hours to desalinate. The corned beef pieces were ready to cook, but we didn’t want to eat them until the next day, so they returned to the brine for one more day.

Day Eleven - January 18, 2014

Day Eleven – January 18, 2014

After they finished their soak, we dried off the pastrami pieces, coated them lightly with cooking oil and a hefty sprinkling of our spice mixture. 

Day Eleven - January 18, 2014

Day Eleven – January 18, 2014

Spice mixture coating both pieces of the pastrami. The mixture contains pepper, coriander, mustard powder, brown sugar, paprika, garlic powder and onion powder. Now, this is going back into the fridge for another week.

Day Twelve - January 19, 2014

Day Twelve – January 19, 2014

Finally time to actually cook something! The corned beef goes into a large pot of water and is boiled (simmered, really) for 30 minutes. Change the water and repeat, this time boiling (simmering) for 3.5 hours. When it was done, it looked like a brown hunk of meat. Not exactly beautiful until we cut into it…

Day Eleven - January 19, 2014

Day Eleven – January 19, 2014

On the left is the flat, which is the leaner cut of meat. The point (on the right) was definitely tastier. Both were absolutely delicious – the point was just juicer, probably due to the higher fat content. Plus, when does the leaner version of something ever taste as good as full fat?

Day Eleven - January 29, 2014

Day Eleven – January 19, 2014

I had a stack of meat on a plate for lunch. Everyone else made ruebens. Everyone thoroughly enjoy the meal.

Day Seventeen - January 25, 2014

Day Seventeen – January 25, 2014

Finally time to pull the pastrami out of the fridge. We set up the smoker and started out with apple wood. About halfway through, we used some hickory wood and near the end, some cherry.

Day Seventeen - January 25, 2014

Day Seventeen – January 25, 2014

The meat went on the smoker (left) around 10 a.m. We kept the pit temperature around 225 degrees. Five hours in (middle) and the meat had hit its stall. It was sitting comfortably around 170 degrees and wasn’t budging. This is the part of smoking where you learn patience. One of the pieces of meat moved out of its stall and the other still wasn’t budging, so we eventually went out and swapped their positions on the smoker. Then, they both were headed in the right direction again. Shortly after 10pm (right), the meat had finally come to the temperature we were looking for.

We took it inside, tried a little piece (it was chewy) and wrapped it in aluminum foil. The meat needs to completely cool off before heating it to eat.

Day Eighteen - January 26, 2014

Day Eighteen – January 26, 2014

At some point, we realized that we didn’t actually have a steamer large enough for these pieces of meat, so dad made one from a sheet of grill-steel and some nuts, bolts and washers. We steamed the meat for a little over two hours, until it reached an internal temperature of 203 degrees. After a long wait, it was finally ready to eat. And it was delicious. The flavors and textures were truly unlike anything I’ve ever eaten.

In the end, we came to a few conclusions:

  • Yes, this is something that we would do again.
  • We used too much spice rub on the pastrami – it was tastier if we knocked a bit of it off before eating.
  • I (Connor) prefer the Corned Beef over the Pastrami. Of course, that’s the same conclusion I came to at Katz’s, so it really wasn’t a huge surprise.
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Challenge Week 3: One Pot – Bacon – Corn Chowder with Shrimp

I’m working my way through Reddit’s 52 Weeks of Cooking Challenge. The challenge is aimed to help any level cook expand their knowledge and cook outside of their comfort zones.

Week three theme – One Pot.

Shrimp and Corn Chowder

I sorta love one-pot cooking. I also sorta love corn chowders. I found this Cooking Light recipe and thought it sounded perfect. 

I’m not a big fan of celery, but thought the soup needed some spice to it. So I nixed the celery from the recipe and added a poblano pepper. It was easy, delicious, and definitely on the make-again list!

Bacon-Corn Chowder with Shrimp
Serves 4
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Total Time
30 min
Total Time
30 min
Ingredients
  1. 6 slices center-cut bacon, chopped
  2. 1 cup prechopped onion
  3. 1 poblano pepper, chopped
  4. 1 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme
  5. 1 garlic clove, minced
  6. 5 cups fresh or frozen corn kernels, thawed
  7. 2 cups fat-free, lower-sodium chicken broth
  8. 3/4 pound peeled and deveined medium shrimp
  9. 1/3 cup half-and-half
  10. 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  11. 1/8 teaspoon salt
Instructions
  1. Heat a large dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add bacon pieces to pan and sauté until bacon begins to brown. Remove 1/3 of the bacon using a slotted spoon and drain on paper towel.
  2. Add onion, poblano pepper, thyme and garlic to pan. Saute for two minutes, or until fragrant.
  3. Add corn and cook for two minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Add broth and bring to boil. Boil for 4 minutes.
  5. Remove 2 cups of corn mixture and place in large measuring cup. Using an immersion blender, blend until smooth.
  6. Return pureed mixture to pan.
  7. Stir in shrimp and cook for 2 minutes, or until shrimp are done.
  8. Stir in half and half, salt and pepper.
  9. Crumble reserved bacon over soup for servings.
Adapted from Cooking Light
Adapted from Cooking Light
I'm in the Kitchen http://connorguyton.me/
 

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New Orleans Praline

After spending a weekend in the Big Easy, I was excited to try my hand at making pralines. I never have any luck making candies here in Mississippi because the humidity screws them all up. But surely pralines have to be the exception here. After all, they make them humid day after humid day in New Orleans! 

Praline IngredientsLike I’ve said before, my brother (John) lives in Baton Rouge now and his girlfriend (Katie) in New Orleans. Since they were both in town and neither had ever made pralines, I figured we’d do it together. I’m also way better about collecting my mise en place when someone else is cooking with me. 

I was also starting with Inglewood Pecans from my Holiday Besh Box. The recipe couldn’t be easier – dump all the ingredients into a large enough pot and stir until it reaches 238-240 degrees F. 

Since I had invited them over for such a non-spectacular cooking adventure, I let John and Katie spoon them onto the mats when the praline mixture was ready.

PralinesThey spooned them into pretty big disks, but they were the perfect size for sharing! Once they cooled off and we could try them, we were all in agreement that they were delicious. These will definitely become a staple.

 

New Orleans Pralines
Yields 24
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Prep Time
2 min
Cook Time
12 min
Total Time
30 min
Prep Time
2 min
Cook Time
12 min
Total Time
30 min
Ingredients
  1. 1 1/2 cups granulated white sugar
  2. 3/4 cup light brown sugar, packed
  3. 1/2 cup whole milk
  4. 6 tablespoons salted butter
  5. 2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  6. 1 1/2 cup roughly chopped pecans
Instructions
  1. Combine all the ingredients in a medium sauce pan, at least 4 quarts.
  2. Cook the syrup over medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. When it comes to a boil, start stirring constantly. Let it boil until the syrup registers 238° - 240°F.
  3. Remove the pan from heat immediately and keep stirring. Stir, stir, stir! It will become creamy, cloudy, and start to thicken. When you feel it starting to get grainy, the pralines are ready.
  4. Drop spoonfuls of the praline syrup onto your waiting parchment. Work quickly, as the syrup starts to set as it gets cool. Let the pralines cool and harden for at least ten minutes before eating.
Notes
  1. Collect your ingredients before you start. It is also helpful to setup parchment paper or silpats before starting.
  2. Pralines will keep in an airtight container for several days, but they're at their very best within the first 24 hours of making them!
I'm in the Kitchen http://connorguyton.me/
 

 

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Challenge Week 2: Polish – Rogaliki Cookies

I’m working my way through Reddit’s 52 Weeks of Cooking Challenge. The challenge is aimed to help any level cook expand their knowledge and cook outside of their comfort zones.

Week two theme – Polish.

RogalikiMy experience with Polish food pretty much ends at kielbasa sausage. So I scoured the internet to find something that I could bake and take to share at work. I found this recipe for Polish Rogaliki (Almond Crescent Cookies) and decided to adapt it into something I could make with ingredients I always have on hand.

During the process, they became Pecan Crescent Cookies because (a) I always have pecans and (b) I never have almonds. 

Now, I’m not Polish and have no idea how these are supposed to taste, but I think what I ended up with was pretty delicious.

Pecan Rogaliki
Yields 30
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Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
50 min
Prep Time
20 min
Cook Time
30 min
Total Time
50 min
Ingredients
  1. 1/2 pound (2 sticks) butter
  2. 1/2 cup sugar
  3. 1 egg yolk
  4. 2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  5. 1/3 cup plus 1/4 cup ground pecans
  6. 1 1/3 cups all-purpose flour
  7. Confectioners' sugar
Instructions
  1. Heat oven to 350 degrees. In a stand mixer, cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in egg yolk and vanilla, mixing well. Add pecans and flour, thoroughly incorporating.
  2. Using walnut-size pieces of dough, shape into a crescent and place on ungreased baking sheets. Bake 30 minutes or until slightly brown on the edges.
  3. While still hot, roll in confectioners' sugar. Re-roll in confectioners sugar when cool and store tightly covered.
Adapted from About.com
Adapted from About.com
I'm in the Kitchen http://connorguyton.me/
 

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Challenge Week 1: Eggs – Very Vanilla Creme Brûlée

I’m working my way through Reddit’s 52 Weeks of Cooking Challenge. The challenge is aimed to help any level cook expand their knowledge and cook outside of their comfort zones.

Week One theme – Eggs.

Creme BruleeThere are tons of good applications for eggs. But I’ve always seen Creme Brûlée as a decadent treat. I chose a meal over my birthday weekend to make it and it was delicious, although there were a few bumps in the road making it.

After I had my heart set on it, I realized that my ex-boyfriend took the brûlée torch (technically it was his, but my mom gave it to him) with him when he moved out. So I had to find a new method of toasting the top.

I read online where others had successfully toasted using the broiler in the oven and tried it on one at my apartment and it worked quite well. Then, when doing it at my mom’s house, I assume the broiler wasn’t as hot as mine because it took entirely too long to toast the top and the custard warmed up and became runny in the process.

It didn’t change the delicious flavor of the dish, just the texture. And it was a great learning experience. I think next time, I will just find a torch.

Very Vanilla Creme Brûlée
Serves 6
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Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
4 hr 45 min
Prep Time
5 min
Cook Time
40 min
Total Time
4 hr 45 min
Ingredients
  1. 3 cups dairy*
  2. 1 vanilla bean, split and scraped
  3. 6 large egg yolks
  4. 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  5. turbinado sugar
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Heat the dairy, vanilla bean pod and scrapings in a large saucepan over medium heat.
  3. Put the egg yolks and 1/2 cup sugar in a heatproof mixing bowl and whisk until pale yellow in color and all sugar has dissolved.
  4. Once the dairy comes to a boil and begins to thicken, take it off the heat. Temper about a 1/2 cup of the dairy mixture into the eggs and whisk vigorously to incorporate well.
  5. Add the remainder of the dairy, whisking vigorously.
  6. Strain the brûlée base through a fine mesh sieve.
  7. Pour the strained custard into ramekins and place the dishes in a roasting pan. Add enough hot water to the pan to come halfway up the ramekins.
  8. Place in the middle rack of the oven and bake for 30 minutes, turning halfway through to ensure even cooking.
  9. When done, they will still be slightly jiggly in the middle, but mostly set.
  10. Remove from oven and allow to cool to room temperature. Refrigerate until completely set.
  11. Freeze for 30 minutes to an hour before serving.
  12. Spread 1 Tbsp turbinado sugar over the top of each dish and use a blowtorch to caramelize the sugar on top.
  13. Alternatively, preheat your broiler to high and place the dishes on the top rack of the oven and watch very closely until browned.
  14. Let cool for a few minutes before serving.
Notes
  1. *I used 1 cup heavy cream, 1 cup half and half and 1 cup whole milk when I made my creme brûlées because I needed to finish off the half and half in my refrigerator. The higher the ratio of cream to milk, the more creamy your final custard will be.
I'm in the Kitchen http://connorguyton.me/
 

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